Websockets in XPages: Improving on the automated partialRefresh interface

In this article I will further discuss how tom improve the user experience of an automated partial Refresh on an user’s XPage. Although these posts were originally about using Bluemix to host the node.js server I kinda feel that the focus has drifted onto websockets more than Bluemix. So in an attempt to make it easier to find I am going to use the Websockets in XPages title moniker for a few posts and then go back to Bluemix 🙂

Introduction

In the last article we looked at how to push a automated partialRefresh to a XPage application using websockets. In that article it was noted that the user experience was not ideal because the whole panel refreshed without the user knowing about it. For some apps that is appropriate and for others it may not be. At this point in his career Dave Leedy is impressed he gave someone else and idea and I quote: “wow! that’s fricken awesome!!!”

So, that’s not a great user experience – what if they were doing something at the time?

Yes I was thinking that too! So I believe we can improve the user experience a little and take what Dave suggested and tweak it a little. Now where have a seen something which let’s the user know there is new data changes but doesn’t refresh the page without their action……….

b4

oh yeah that.

Instead of refreshing the control automatically, we will make the message create a “refresh” icon on the page which the user can then update at their leisure.

b5

The modified code is all in what happens when the page receives the refresh socket message. I added a jQuery rotate function just for some added “je ne sais quoi“. In the function we can see that when the refresh event is detected by the socket code the refreshControl function is called. This in turn makes the hidden refreshIcon visible, adds an onClick event and then rotates it. The onClick event performed the partialRefreshGet as we saw in the previous example turning the page briefly grey. We then hide the icon and remove the click event (to avoid piling on multiple events as the page gets continually refreshed)

 

 // Function to add a message to the page
  var refreshControl = function(data) {

	  $('.refreshIcon')
	  	.css({display: 'block'})
	  	.on('click', function(){
	  	   var temp = $('[id*='+data.refreshId+']').css({background: '#CCCCCC', color: 'white'}).attr('id')
		   XSP.partialRefreshGet(temp, {})
		   $(this).css({display: 'none'}).off('click')
	  	})
	  	.rotate({
	      angle:0,
	      animateTo:360,
	      easing: function (x,t,b,c,d){        // t: current time, b: begInnIng value, c: change In value, d: duration
	          return c*(t/d)+b;
	      }
	   })
  };

  // When a refresh message is received from the server
  // action it
  socket.on('refresh', function(data) { refreshControl(data); });

The following video quickly demonstrates the new capability.

Conclusion

In this brief article we concentrated on how to improve a user experience by notifying them that changes were pending and then allowing them to determine when the changes were made.

I still don’t think this is as optimal as I would like but you get the idea. As I said a long time ago – the more DOM you are reloading the worse the user experience. With a viewPanel we are kinda limited on what we can and cannot refresh. A better option may be to architect the application just the new data and update as appropriate……….

 

Advertisements