SharePoint now accessible via the Microsoft Graph beta

Last week at Ignite it was announced that finally Microsoft was bringing O365 SharePoint access to the Microsoft graph as an API. This is a huge deal for those of us who want to use O365 as a platform and develop engaging applications for customers. In my case for Office Add-ins this is great because it reduced the number of OAuth hoops I have to jump through and manage to get the data I want.

Here is a link to the documentation: Working with SharePoint sites in Microsoft Graph and a quick example.

NOTE: this is beta and will change – this is purely a demonstration of what is possible today (Oct 2016) and not to be used as future reference.

Example

Using the graph explorer demo I am able to bring up content from my default SharePoint site very easily

https://graph.microsoft.io/en-us/graph-explorer#

Here is my copper site within my SharePoint tenant

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and here it is referenced from the graph API

https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/sharepoint/sites/site-id

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here is the API response of the lists
https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/sharepoint/sites/site-id/lists

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and here is a reference to the documents in the Shared Documents folder

https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/sharepoint/sites/site-id/lists/list-id/items

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How cool is that !!!!!

 

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Reading an excel file from OneDrive using REST and the Microsoft Graph API

In this article I will demonstrate how to get sample information from an Excel file stored in a OneDrive, using nothing more than the Microsoft Graph API.

Introduction 

Richard diZerega blogged about and has talked further on the new beta graph API capability for Using OneDrive and Excel APIs in the Microsoft Graph for App Storage. Using that as a reference and the Excel REST API for the graph documentation I was able to piece together this example.

Getting data from an excel file

Load a sample excel file into your OneDrive root, in this case marky.xlsx with a simple example

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Access the file using the Graph API

Using the Graph Explorer we are able to test out our files. Note that this is currently (1 Aug 2016) in BETA and the left hand drop down for version must be beta. The URLs referenced in this article all contain /beta/. Once the capability goes GA then it will become part of the next version 1.0+.

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and there we have our data from the excel file – pretty simple eh !

Conclusion

Using the Microsoft Graph API we can easily reach into an excel file, stored in OneDrive and extract the data for use in other places.

 

EDIT

And then not two days later this went GA – so v1.0 also now works 🙂

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Using RegEx to extract MIME parts from a Microsoft Graph API email stream

In this article I will demonstrate how a Regular Expression can be used to extract all MIME content references from within an HTML Stream.

Introduction

In the previous article we looked at how the base64 encoded version of an embedded MIME Image can be extracted from the Microsoft Graph. In this article we will start to look at how we are going to  automate the solving of that problem by identifying all the MIME encoded images from within the graph API HTML stream.

Regular expressions

RegEx is mentally challenging to most of us, and that is why some beautiful people created Stackoverflow and Google. I was able to find this solution to a similar problem of extracting tag attributes from an HTML string.

Modifying this slightly for my needs in context of the graph I was able to come up with the following:

var content = data.body.content;
var cids = content.match(/cid["']?((?:.(?!["']?\s+(?:\S+)=|[>"']))+.)?/g);

and this will take an HTML stream with different kinds of MIME reference and return them all as an array.

Here is the sample HTML string with just the images highlightedc1

and here’s the result of the test in firebug logging the cids array

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Conclusion

In this article we have seen that with a simple Regular expression we can extract the Image src attributes relating to the MIME parts within the MS Graph API feed.

Caveat: This assumes a lot about the structure of the API and that is will continue to conform to this structure.

 

Where are the MIME-embedded images in a Microsoft Graph REST API call?

In this article I will demonstrate the steps necessary to correctly extract the embedded image MIME entities from within the HTML provided from the Microsoft Graph API (v1.0).

Introduction

Using the Microsoft Graph API we are able to extract the HTML body from an email given the message id. That HTML could then in theory be stored separately and the email reviewed for later. Here is a simple example using the graph explorer example website .

https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/users(‘GUID’)/messages/messageId

Here is the Original email

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Here is the graph API representation of that email with the HTML highlighted

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Here is the HTML extracted and saved as marky.html

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and here is the marky.html file displayed in the browser.

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This works well for this kind of email because it is HTML and references external CSS images and pictures – it can be recreated with a high confidence in fidelity.

This is unfortunately not the case when you send internal email through outlook and other email clients.

Embedded MIME

Generally when email is sent directly from a mail client it contains embedded MIME images and when you download the HTML for that web page you get contentId (cid: ) references like this.

The original email sent with an inline image:

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The HTML generated from the Graph API contains a “cid” reference

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which ultimately leads to a failed image as there is now no real reference to the image:

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(sad face)

The image reference is src=”cid:image001.png@01D1C6EE.58865610″  and that reference we will use in the next section

Getting the image

We have to use the graph API to retrieve the images in different way. The images are actually recorded as “Attachments” within the graph API and are accessible via the API in the following manner.

https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/users(‘GUID’)/messages/messageId/attachments

What we get back from that request looks like this with the cid reference in the contentId.

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The contentBytes value of the attachment is actually the base64 encoded version of the image originally references in the email. If we take that base64 encoded value (in this case it was 96k in size) and replace the image source in marky.html it looks like this:

src=”data:image/jpeg;base64,contentBytesHERE”

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and when we view marky.html we now see the image.

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Conclusion

In this article we have looked at where all the information can be found to get the images for storage outside of the Microsoft Graph, but we have not looked into the complications of how you would go about automating this process. That would a potentially large number of requests (based on the number of embedded images) and would also be time consuming.

But, the information is out there if you know where to look.