Renewed as a Microsoft MVP 2018-2019

I am very honoured and humbled to be renewed as a Microsoft MVP for 2018-2019 in the category of Office Development. The MVP program recognizes content creators, code providers and conference speakers who want to share their knowledge and broaden the outreach of the platforms they work with.

Since I got involved in Office Add-In development over two years ago it has been an truely gratifying, eye-opening experience to see what a transformed company Microsoft is. I have never written a line of .NET code. I am a web developer, and using those web dev. skills I am now a Microsoft developer and MVP. The me of ten years ago would never have believed it possible 🙂

 

Thank you to Microsoft for the recognition and all the perks which come along with the award.
Thank you to every one at PSCGroup who continues to enable me in what I do and love, and long may it continue.
Thank you to all the friends I have met along the way and who’s encouragement is always wecome and appreciated.

 

 

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How Windows 10 virtual desktops help me with Office 365 development

In this article I will show how the Windows 10 virtual desktops help keep my brain organized for Office 365 development. It allows me to keep my Chrome Primary work profile for email etc completely separate from my developer tenat Chrome profile. It helps keep me more organized when working on multiple projects as well.

Background

Anyone who has more than one development and primary Office 365 account has come across the age old problem of which environment am I currently working in. Using Chrome profiles as a number of people have blogged about has been a huge help in this. Having a Chrome profile for dev tenant and profile for primary account (work email etc) is a huge help.

But the downside is many instances of chrome floating around and when you click on a link in Outlook it opens in the last Chrome window you were working on – which is frustrating at the best of times when your dev tenant says you dont have access to your primary email (duh) and then you have to hunt down the primary profile window and go back to outlook and start again.

Windows 10 Virtual Desktop

This is where the virtual desktop has really become my best friend for Office365 development. In the latest version of Windows 10 you can easily make a virtual desktop by adding the “Show Task View button” from the context menu when right clicking on the windows task bar.

Clicking on the Task icon brings up the option to create a new virtual desktop and also a view of some of things you have worked on recently.

Opening a new virtual desktop everything is blank and you can open Chrome and go to your dev chrome profile happily.

Switching between desktops

You can go through the process of Task View and clicking on the desktop you want

OR

You can use CTRL-WINDOWSKEY-Left/Right to navigate back and forth between the desktops. They don’t cycle but if you only have two then Left or Right isn’t that hard 🙂

Clicking a link in outlook

If I am working in desktop 2 (O365Dev) and I go back to Desktop 1(primary O365), clicking a link in the primary O365 Outlook opens the link in the primary desktop chrome profile. Always.

YAY 🙂

Mentally this also helps me keep my Director day job (primary O365) and dev environment (xomino365) separate and makes life easier.

It’s not for everyone but really helps me 🙂

Extra Bonus shortcut

I discovered by accident (as you do) that you can create a new Virtual desktop using the CTRL key and a three-finger down swipe on the laptop.

 

 

Office Add-Ins: Working with Tables in Word. Part 4: Getting a table in a Content Control

In this article we will see how to use a ContentControl to quickly and accurately access a table in a Word document.

Introduction

In previous articles we have seen how to get a Table using a search or cycling through allTables in the document. While these are two perfectly valid methods they come with some potential issues and considerations for architecting the Word document itself. In this article we will see how to control access to the right table at the right time without the concerns or issues from the previous article.

Content Controls

Rich Text Content controls are the only content controls supported in Office.js (as of version 1.3). The documentation for the Content control API documentation shows us that we can get a content control via a “tag” which is assigned to the Content Control in Developer Mode within the word document.

Create a Content Control on your word document and give it a Tag (Birds in this case)

In normal mode we can then insert a table

Using the following code we can access the content control, get the first (only) table inside there and manipulate it by adding a new row.

async function runContent() {
    await Word.run(async (context) => {

        // Create a proxy object for the content controls collection that contains a specific tag.
        var contentBirds = context.document.contentControls.getByTag('Birds');
        // Queue a command to load the tag property for all of content controls. 
        context.load(contentBirds, 'tag');
        await context.sync()

        // Queue a commmand to load the results.
        const tableCollection = contentBirds.items[0].tables;
        context.load(tableCollection);
        await context.sync()
        var theTable = tableCollection.items[0];
        context.load(theTable, '');
        await context.sync();
        let numRows = theTable.rowCount.toString()
        theTable.addRows("End", 1, [[numRows, "Phoenix"]])
        
    });
}

The inserted row can be seen, and in a similar manner to the previous article we can log the amount of time taken to execute the function. In this case it is slightly slower (100ms) than searching (80ms) (there is more context loading) but it is consistent and does not come with any of the disadvantages of having to search for a specific term in a table.

Note

The obvious downside to this method is if a user of the word document takes the table out of the content control (either on purpose or by mistake). Checks should be put int he code to determine that if the table cannot be found then call the elgant error handling.

Conclusion

This is the most reliable manner for accessing a table quickly and accurately within a Word document, but does come with a small amount of additional overhead and the extra construct of having to have a Content Control within the Word document.

Office Add-Ins: Working with Tables in Word. Part 3: Two methods for getting existing tables

In this article I will demonstrate a method for getting to a Table using the prescribed methods in the API context.body.

Background

In previous articles we jhave seen how to create a table from scratch using the API or using OOXML. In this article we will look at how to reference an existing table and get a handle on it. We are going to look at two methods, one direct and one indirect, both have advantages and disadvantages.

Getting a table via the API directly

Within the the API model you can access all tables through the context.document.body.tables

The Methods (at leave in v1.3) are rather limiting and you cannot get a Table directly by name or id.

        const tableCollection = context.document.body.tables;

and from there you can reference each table individually through the index.

            theTable = tableCollection.items[i]

What this does not however facilitate is getting the table you want, directly. Let’s say I want to get the Insects table from the image below – how do I get that?

Well if you KNOW it is the nth table in the document then you are fine – but the chances are you don’t or at best can’t be sure.

Testing each table

What you can do is cycle through all the tables in the collection and test the first cell. I have specifically created these tables in such a manner that the first cell in the table is testable. Cycling through all the tables allows me to do a simple test of the first cell and if it is Insects then I know I am in the right table.

In this example we get all tables and then once we have the Insects table I insert a row:

async function runAllTables() {
    await Word.run(async (context) => {

        const tableCollection = context.document.body.tables;
        // Queue a commmand to load the results.
        context.load(tableCollection);
        await context.sync()
        //cycle through the tbale collection and test the first cell of each table looking for insects
        for (var i = 0; i < tableCollection.items.length; i++) {
            var theTable = null;
            theTable = tableCollection.items[i];
            var cell1 = theTable.values[0][0];
            if (cell1 == "Insects") {
                //once found, load the table in memory and add a row
                context.load(theTable, '');
                await context.sync();
                let numRows = theTable.rowCount.toString()
                theTable.addRows("End", 1, [[numRows, "Lightning Bug"]])
            }
        }
    });
}

As the number of tables in the document increase this gets slower and slower (understandably). There is also a limitation on the fact that you might not be able to identify the Table with a value in the first cell as easily (depends on requirements). As you can see from this example in the console.log I added the length of time to complete the addRow and it is 77ms on three tables. If I copy and past the first two tables and make a lot more of them you can see the speed gets slower (124ms) which might not seem like a lot, but in a large document with lots of large tables it can become significant to the end user.

Searching for a word in the document, and then getting the table parent

If you are able to identify a string in your table, you can search for that string and then get the parentTable. That method for finding your table is much more efficient and faster than getting all tables in a collection as per the previous method.

In this example we search for Insects, get the parentTable and then simply insert a row with a new value

async function runSearch() {
    await Word.run(async (context) => {
        const body = context.document.body 
        const insectRangeCollection = body.search("Insects");
        // Queue a commmand to load the results.
        context.load(insectRangeCollection);
        await context.sync()
        //get the parent table from the search result range
        const table1 = insectRangeCollection.getFirst().parentTable
        context.load(table1, '');
        await context.sync()
        let numRows2 = table1.rowCount.toString()
        table1.addRows("End", 1, [[numRows2, "Butterfly"]])
    });
}

As with the previous example – if I copy and paste the first two tables and make a lot more of them, you will see that this search and add row process remains approx the same speed as before.

 

Conclusion

While neither of these methods are ideal, if you know what is possible before you start to create your solution you can work in your options. Not having an obvious getTableById method is somewhat limiting.

NW Chicago JavaScript Meetup: Overview of E2E Testing with Cypress – June 21

On June 21st PSCGroup will be hosting the NorthWest Chicago JavaScript Meetup in our offices from 6-8:30pm

We are very happy to announce a second speaker – Steve Schwarz !

In addition to the Firebase presentation this should make for a really interesting event 🙂

For more information check out the Meetup site

https://www.meetup.com/Northwest-Chicago-JavaScript/events/250983909/

Office Add-Ins: Working with Tables in Word. Part 2: Creation from OOXML

In this long overdue article I will discuss how to create a custom table, get the OOXML from it, clean it and then be able to insert the table anywhere into a Word document.

Background

In the previous article we looked at how to create a table from  scratch using range.insert table which is nice but limiting in that the formatting of the created table leaves a lot to be desired. It would be much easier to create the table we want first, get the OOXML and then be able to re-insert it pre-formmated so to speak.

Getting the OOXML of a table

One of the examples posted in the Add-in API documention uses the range.getOOXML to show how to extract the OOXML from a highlighted range in a word document. Using the Add-in Script Lab we can easily simulate this in a word document. I took the basic API call example and inserted the code from the API documentation.

 

  1. I created a custom table with hashed borders (formatting) and highlighted it
  2. Click the run code button to execute the sample code
  3. The OOXML was generated in the console below

Inserting OOXML

Using this process in reverse you can then copy the OOXML and using the range.insertOOXML method you can click anywhere in a word document and click a button to insert the preformatted table.

 

Conclusion

While we can format tables manually with code – as we get more complicated with out tables this may not be an option. Inserting as OOXML will guarantee the formatting we want and then allow us to manipulate as a table as we will see next